Grand Opening - October 15, 2005
News & Record, October 13, 2005

Saturday marks an historic moment for the L.E. Coleman African-American Museum since its grand opening will take place from 10 a.m.- 5 p.m. The celebration begins with a 10 a.m. ribbon cutting and continues throughout the entire day.

The Museum, located on State Route 360 some two miles west of the Town of Halifax, is a non-profit arts facility dedicated to promoting artistic excellence that primarily reflects the culture of African-Americans of Halifax County. "We strive to research, collect, and preserve the art, history and culture of African Americans with emphasis on Halifax County to foster among people, the awareness of Virginia history so that they may draw strength and perspective from the past and find purpose for the future," said the Rev. Kevin Chandler.

World renowned sculptor Mr. Donald Brown will be present for a wall dedication, honoring his contribution to the museum. Prints of his sculpture "The Millennium Monument" will be one of the museum's permanent exhibits. Persons wishing to purchase prints may do so on Saturday and have them personally autographed by Mr. Brown.

There will also be a book signing by Mrs. Yolanda Grace Jones, author of "Redemption of Grace: One Woman's Journey from Darkness into Light." Yolanda is a native of Chesapeake. She attended North Carolina A&T University, majoring in music and journalism, but ultimately found a career in graphic design. She will also be playing her flute on Saturday. Currently she is working on four other books, including her first Christian children's book, "The House That Jesus Built." There will also be works of other local artists on display throughout the day.

Museum sponsors invite everyone to come out and help celebrate the opening of this historic structure. The facilities are handicapped accessible.


Contact Mrs. Garnett Luck for more information.




L. E. Coleman Museum Opens This Saturday
Gazette-Virginian, October 14, 2005

Old photographs. paintings and handmade quilts will open doors to another era in Halifax County history when the L.E. Coleman African-American Museum celebrates its grand opening Saturday morning.

The Museum, a former African-American school, is located at 3011 Mountain Road.

The 10 a.m. ribbon-cutting will kick off the day-long celebration, which will include author Yolanda Grace Jones and world-renowned sculptor Donald Brown. Each will be available to sign copies of their work.

Jones, author of "Redemption of Grace: One Woman's Journey From Darkness Into Light," will hold a book signing, and Brown will autograph prints of his sculpture "The Millennium Moment" during the Saturday event. The prints will be available at the museum.

A wall honoring the British-born sculptor's contribution to the museum will also be dedicated during the event.

Brown, creator of the Thurgood Marshall Scholarship Fund Awards, is also founder of the TAOS (The Art of Success) designed to empower students and members of the general public, mentally, physically, spiritually and financially.

Jones, a graphic designer who majored in music and journalism at North Carolina A&T University, will also play her flute during the Saturday event. The author is also currently working on four other books. including her first Christian children's book, "The House That Jesus Built."

The museum will also have works by local artists on display throughout the day.
There are also photocopies of the South Boston Black Hospital, the home of Dr. and Mrs. J.M. Mason.

A 1940s era photograph of business leaders includes insurance owner and NAACP leader J.S. Carrington, former Halifax Training School Principal H.S. Sykes, Dr. Leon V. Ragland, the Rev. Ellis Ragland. Samuel Carter, a teacher and real estate man. Dr. James Mason. the Rev. B. McCargo, educator Matthew Coleman and contractor Allen T. Hamilton.

"We are inviting everyone to come out and help us celebrate this great event," said Museum President Rev. Kevin Chandler.

"We're real excited about opening because we've been working three years getting to this point," Chandler said yesterday. "We're looking to be able to share some' of the historic values I've found to be hidden throughout the county. Professional-level aritsts' work in basements and attics,"he added.

"Our mission is to educate and we are looking forward to working with the school system." Chandler said. "I also want to take this opportunity to thank Barbara Bass (president of the Halifax County Historical Society) for her help."

The Museum is a non-profit arts facility dedicated to promoting artistic excellence that primarily reflects the culture of African-Americans of Halifax County.

"We strive. to research, collect and preserve the art, history and culture of African Americans with emphasis on Halifax County: to foster among people the awareness of Virginia history so that they may draw strength and perspective from the past and find purpose for the future." said the museum president. "The facilities are handicap accessible," he added.

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